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1 in 8 Adults May Have Sensitive Teeth

Having sensitive teeth can be painful, and can cause people to avoid certain types of foods and drinks. Very acidic diets tend to create more sensitivity. Drinking water right after having something acidic, such as orange juice, and then waiting at least 10 minutes before brushing can help to deter sensitivity. Thanks for visiting Texarkana Endodontics, serving Texarkana TX, Hope AR, Paris TX, Broken Bow OK, Idabel OK, Magnolia AR and other surrounding areas. Enjoy reading!

Survey of U.S. dentists finds rates highest among young adults, women

If you sometimes get a jolt of pain in your mouth when you drink or eat something hot or cold, you're not alone: A new survey of U.S. dental offices finds that one in eight people has over-sensitive teeth.

Sensitive teeth were most common in young adults, women and people who had receding gums or did at-home tooth whitening.

"The condition is impacting people's lives, and they may avoid some foods," said Dr. Joana Cunha-Cruz, a research assistant professor at the University of Washington and lead study author. Cold, hot, sweet and acidic foods and drinks often trigger the pain.

"But it's not like they are feeling pain all the time," Cunha-Cruz added. Teeth might be sensitive for a few weeks and then fine for a few weeks.

Sensitive teeth often occurs when enamel on the outside of the tooth, or the tissue between the tooth and gum called cementum, wears away, exposing small tubes that connect nerves inside the tooth to triggers outside of the tooth, Cunha-Cruz said.

The current study included 37 general dental practices in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Utah. A total of 787 adults were surveyed.

The results appear in the March issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

Dentists in the study asked their patients if they had recently been bothered by pain, sensitivity or discomfort in their teeth or gums. Then the dentists examined the patients to make sure their pain was not due to another problem, such as a cavity, chipped tooth or swollen gums.

About 12 percent of patients had pain or sensitivity that was not related to another problem, and thus were diagnosed as having sensitive teeth.

Knowing the prevalence "gives dentists an idea of how much to look for this problem in their practice," Cunha-Cruz said.

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Topics: Oral Health